Books

Queenie

This coming-of-age story follows Queenie Jenkins as she navigates different cultures, unpromising jobs, and relationship breakdown. Carty-Williams’ debut novels navigates issues from consent to class and mental health in a story that is by turns both hilarious and heart-breaking.

Books

The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano

Olaudah Equiano (or Gustavus Vassa). Equiano was born around 1745. He was captured from modern day Nigeria as a child and taken by slave ship to Barbados. After being sold several times and moved around the globe, in 1766 Equino managed to buy his own freedom. This influential autobiography tells the story of his life.

Articles + Essays

How Black Americans still face disproportionate barriers to the ballot box in 2020

150 years since Black men were first allowed to cast a ballot, there are still overwhelming barriers and disparities around voting. This article chronicles both the changes in voting legislation and the impact on Black Americans from 1870 through 2019.

Books

Freedom is a Constant Struggle

This book is about understanding the civil rights movement is about, "substantive issues like better life conditions for poor people...". This book empowers you to educate yourself on economic racism by analyzing the prison system, healthcare, policing, etc. It asks us to dig deeper into the why. Why is that type of violence possible? Why are police almost trained like the military where the motto is shoot to kill but ultimately there to serve and protect?

TV + Film

Lovecraft Country

This HBO series is a genre-bending exploration of the legacy and mysteries of the Freeman family, one touched by the supernatural. Created by Misha Green, Lovecraft Country examines the generational, cosmic impacts of racism and trauma on Black people, while also celebrating their resilience and excellence.

Articles + Essays

Voter suppression, then and now

This article speaks to the way voter suppression has evovled over time. It went from a poll tax to a tax on people's time. We went from literacy test to testing people's endurance to commute farther as polling places from last election to this one have closed down.

Books

Brit(ish): On Race, Identity and Belonging

Journalist and former lawyer Afua Hirsch’s book details her own experiences of racism and her search for belonging, whilst also situating herself in the historical context of British racism, and the lack of education and understanding which has led to the context of the present day.

Books

The Wonderful Adventures of Mrs Seacole in Many Lands

This autobiographical account of Mary Seacole’s life, mainly focussing on her time as a nurse during the Crimean war. Her struggle to be taken seriously, her bravery, and her determination to act as she chose despite the odds have inspired many in her own time and since.

Books

teaching my mother how to give birth

This poetry collection, quoted extensively in Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade’, explores the intergenerational experience of womanhood, the horrors that drive and haunt refugees, and the cultural heritage of Islam.

Podcasts

Nice White Parents

Nice White Parents is a five-episode podcast series that investigates the history of race and racial equality in NYC public schools. One school in Cobble Hill serves as a microsystem of all that’s wrong with the city’s education system, and as an example of how the desires of liberal white parents have contributed to school segregation and inequity for decades. The podcast explores questions of privilege, power and why history has a tendency to repeat itself.

Articles + Essays

Letter from Birmingham Jail

This letter by MLK Jr. is his explanation to the church for why he ended up in jail in Birmingham. His justification allows the reader to understand the four steps to nonviolent campaigns like protesting.

Books

Noughts and Crosses

Noughts and Crosses is the first in a series that now spans five novels and three novellas. The series imagines an alternate history, in which Europe was colonised by Africa, and follows the lives of two young people as they try to navigate the racism of their society.

Books

Me and White Supremacy

“My book club is currently reading this workbook, and I highly recommend this as a discussion tool for conversations with family and/or friends as each chapter ends with introspective questions. For me, one of the most impactful chapters, thus far, has been, ‘Me and White Centering,’ which is described as a dangerous consequence of white supremacy that puts white-centered narratives in history, entertainment, leadership, beauty, etc. over BIPOC-centered narratives. This chapter drilled in the importance of actively decentering whiteness in every aspect of our everyday lives.”

Art

Charles White: A Retrospective

For me, this was an eye-opening exhibit: visualizing these powerful scenes of the Black American experience made it more tangible and relatable. When you immerse yourself in this exhibit, you can feel the passion, love, sadness and pride White was attempting to convey on behalf of Black Americans. His work is more than just observations: they’re powerful statements and lessons that you can experience for yourself.

Podcasts

Higher Learning with Van Lathan and Rachel Lindsay

Van Lathan, reporter, and Rachel Lindsay, host and former Bachelorette on ABC’s hit show, discuss topics within Black culture, politics, sports, and more. The two cover timely news as well as invite guests who hold interesting perspectives on hot button subjects. For this epsiode, they speak with former House minority leader, Stacey Abrams to discuss voter suppression tactics, the Trump administration, and more as we prepare for the 2020 election.

Books

Hood Feminism

Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot takes aim at the problems with mainstream feminism that centers white middle-to-upper-class women while excluding women of color that lack wealth of their own. Issue by issue, it paints a picture of what true intersectional feminism might look like, focusing on serious concerns that have an impact on underrepresented women and children. Covering topics from gun violence and reproductive justice to food and housing security, Kendall’s collection of essays challenges all the would-be feminists out there to reevaluate the way they think of feminism and live the true mandate of the movement.

TV + Film

Black Panther

Black Panther was more than just a comic book film, and Chadwick Boseman didn’t just bring a comic book character to life. He and his film shined a blinding light on the beauties and complexities of Blackness. He embodied everything that Black people could be, even when internal and external forces try to hold us back. That he accomplished all of this while also fighting for his own life is almost beyond comprehension. By that and any other metric, Chadwick Boseman was the superhero that we were taught as children we didn’t deserve.

Podcasts

TED Radio Hour: Confronting Racism

The entire episode is really powerful, but I found Brittney Cooper’s talk about time as a racialized force eye-opening. I’ve never heard such a direct discussion on the ways in which our understanding of time fuels systems of oppression.

Documentaries

White Fragility Lecture with Dr. Robin DiAngelo

The White Fragility lecture is a call to action for white people to see their whiteness and take the opportunity to make things better. She discusses why it’s hard for white people to talk about racism and how to be honest with themselves.

Articles + Essays

Color-Blindness is Counterproductive

This Atlantic article explores how ‘colorblind’ ideology often perpetuates discriminatory social, economic and institutional practices. Through compelling arguments by academics and sociologists, it raises compelling questions. Could a more nuanced understanding of race, one that sets aside concepts like colorblindness entirely, work to address the macroaggression like police brutality?

Podcasts

Code Switch: Kamala, Joe, And The Fissures In The Base

Through an examination of this year’s Democratic primary race, this episode of Code Switch explores the generational and ideological tensions among Black voters going into the 2020 presidential election. It underscores the pitfalls of treating this voting bloc as a monolith despite overwhelmingly voting for Democratic candidates.

Documentaries

John Lewis: Good Trouble

Good Trouble takes a look at the life and career of the legendary civil rights activist and Democratic Representative from Georgia. Using interviews and archival footage, this documentary highlights John Robert Lewis’ 60-plus years of social activism and legislative action on civil rights, voting rights, health-care reform and immigration to name a few.

TV + Film

Black is King

Black is King is a visually stunning celebration of black culture, music, and style across all parts of the diaspora teeming with African and Caribbean influences. Based on the 2019 live action film, The Lion King, it follows a young King and Queen on their quest for their own crowns.

Art

Funky Friday | Black Artists Matter

Curated by KWT Global’s Diversity and Inclusion Committee, this playlist spans the last 80 years of popular music celebrating influential Black artist. And yes, it’s perfectly timed to get your through the work day.

Art

Big Floyd & the Influence Of Houston Chopped N Screwed Music

Hosts Charlie Harding and Nate Sloan break down the woozy, syrupy beats and underground hip-hop collective that shaped Houston’s ‘chopped and screwed’ sound. In highlighting the legendary Screwed Up Click and George Floyd’s affiliation, the episode shines a light on the influence of 'chopped and screwed' music on mainstream music.

Podcasts

No Country for Young Women

Hosts Sadia Azmat and Monty Onanuga speak with Nadine Batchelor-Hunt, a podcaster, journalist and Black Jewish woman who speaks to her experience about what it was like growing up both Black and Jewish in the UK. The three discuss the anti-semitic tweets from musician Wiley and the nuances and intersections of true allyship.

Books

Between the World and Me

Ta-Nehisi Coates' Between the World and Me is a nonfiction novel in which Coates details his trials, tribulations, and triumphs growing up as a black man in America, but more specifically, one of the countries toughest cities, Baltimore, MD. The book is structured as somewhat of a roadmap for his son to follow on his journey to manhood in hopes that he won't have to face the same struggles.

Articles + Essays

Calling Someone Other Than the Cops

Written by Conor Friedersdorf, this article explores the alternatives when it comes to addressing the adversarial interactions people have with police. Friedersdorf explores what assigning fewer jobs to the police would look like and how replacing them with civilians would enrich communities and prevent innocent people from getting harmed.

TV + Film

Do The Right Thing

Written, directed, and produced by director Spike Lee in 1989, Do The Right Thing explores the racial tensions amongst communities in a Brooklyn neighborhood. Shining a light on a microcosm of characters in 1980s New York, the film explores prescient topics of racism and violence while drawing on mediums of comedy and drama to steep its story in authenticity.

Documentaries

13th

Ava DuVernay's powerful and informative documentary, 13th seeks to prove that though slavery was "abolished" in 1865 with the 13th amendment, it lives on as a booming industry in America. All thanks to a small loophole in the amendment along with unjust practices such as Jim Crow laws, the war on drugs, and the school to prison pipeline. She exposes the ways in which the American judicial system exploits African American's, allowing for modern day slavery.

Articles + Essays

Justice in the Age of Big Data

Cathy O'Neil explains the detrimental feedback loop that is created by crime prediction software. While on paper there can be benefits to predicting where crimes will take place, if the data set includes "nuisance crimes" like vagrancy, aggressive panhandling and selling and consuming small quantities of drugs, more police are drawn into those neighborhoods and thus, more people are arrested for low level crimes.

Articles + Essays

Say Their Names; Know Their Names

We say their names. We learn their stories. But how do we continue supporting the families of those lost to police brutality? How do we continue to remember them? This site searches for answers.

Articles + Essays

Communications Toolkit for Social Justice

This beautifully designed toolkit takes readers through a step by step process on how to strategically approach speaking to social justice. The focus of this toolkit is to outline framing principles and strategies that support the long-term movement and then apply them toward shorter-term victories.

Documentaries

I Am Not Your Negro

I Am Not Your Negro brings James Baldwin's unfinished manuscript, Remember This House, to life. The documentary is chock-full of archival material and recounts Baldwin's notes on the lives and assassinations of civil rights leaders, Medgar Evers, Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X.

Podcasts

Pod Save the People

On Pod Save the People, DeRay Mckesson explores news, culture, social justice, and politics with Sam Sinyangwe, Kaya Henderson and De’Ara Balenger. They offer a unique take on the news, with a special focus on overlooked stories and topics that often impact people of color.

Podcasts

Intersectionality Matters!

Intersectionality Matters! is hosted by American civil rights advocate and leading critical race theory scholar, Professor Kimberlé Crenshaw. It features interview with some of the world's most interesting and innovative activists, artists, and scholars approaching current events through an intersectional lens. They cover various topics from voter suppression in the upcoming election, to the effects of COVID on prisoners and immigrants in detention centers.

TV + Film

When They See Us

Based on the true story of the Central Park Five, Ava DuVernay's powerful four episode Netflix show depicts the story of the wrongful 1990 conviction of five black boys from Harlem in the violent rape and assault of a 28 year old white woman in Central Park. The show explores America's unjust judicial system and the difficulties ex-convicts face when adjusting to a new world.

Articles + Essays

Malcolm and Martin

Written by James Baldwin in 1972, this Esquire article recounts Baldwin's interactions with Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X. Through personal narratives, Baldwin speaks to the intricacies of how MLK, Malcolm X and his own forms of activism interacted and intersected with one another.

TV + Film

Precious

Based on the novel Push by Sapphire, Precious tells the story of a young black teenager fighting to overcome sexual and physical abuse, poverty, and neglect to survive and achieve a better future for herself.

TV + Film

Fruitvale Station

Based on the true tragedy of Oscar Grant, this film follows his life in the Bay Area, trying to legally make ends meet for his girlfriend and young daughter. The film focuses mainly on Oscar's final day on Earth. What was supposed to be a harmless New Year's Eve celebration with friends, ended as a cautionary tale for black men and their dealings with police.

Documentaries

LA 92

National Geographic documentary showcasing the tumultuous LA riots following the Rodney King trial verdict of 1992. The documentary does an incredible job of providing cultural context around the racial tensions of that time and highlights the eerie parallels between the '92 LA riots and '56 Watts riots - questioning how much progress America has truly made with police brutality.

Books

Beloved

Toni Morrison's Beloved is a fictional piece that follows the lives of escaped slave Sethe and her daughter Denver who live in a haunted house in the late 1870s. Spiritual, heartrending, and written at times in gruesomely realistic ways, Beloved is one of those books that makes your soul ache. It takes a piece of you after you put it down, but gives you something just as valuable, if not more, in return.

TV + Film

Get Out

Get Out explores the complicated racial dynamics at play in interracial relationships during a meet-the-parents weekend with a darker purpose than initially meets the eye.

Documentaries

Disclosure

Depictions in the media shape how we see the world around us and how we see ourselves. Through heartfelt interviews with leading trans creatives and thinkers, Disclosure gives an in-depth look at tv and film depictions of transgender people and the impact of those stories not just on transgender lives but American culture.

Podcasts

1619

This six-part podcast is a strong entry point into the New York Times’ ongoing interactive project examining the centuries-long shadow of slavery and its presence in modern-day America. Each episode traces issues like the fight for access to healthcare or the ‘sound’ of American music back to the institution of slavery and the role enslaved people played in shaping our country.

Books

The Bluest Eye

Toni Morrison is arguably one of the most profound writers in history, and her debut novel is no exception. The Bluest Eye looks at themes of beauty, conformity and Black womanhood, and is one of the most poetic investigations of intersectional identities I've ever read.

Podcasts

Rough Translation | The Global Legacy of George Floyd

In this episode, NPR’s Rough Translation explores the impact of George Floyd’s death. A Dutch lawyer, Indigenous activist in New Zealand, Syrian artist, social media consultant in Brazil, and a senior lecturer in Kenya discuss the ways in which it has reflected injustice and systems of oppressions in their own countries.

Articles + Essays

White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack

This brief but impactful article written by Peggy McIntosh in 1989 reconciles her own grapplings with white privilege. This is an incredibly important piece to read for white people seeking to be better allies to Black Americans and people of color -- it's difficult to ignore the truth when it's bulleted in a list.

TV + Film

POSE

Set in the late 80's and early 90's, Pose is a celebration of the New York City ballroom scene and the LGBTQ community who thrived within it. The series is the first with a predominantly trans cast and crew.

TV + Film

Moonlight

The Oscar-winning Moonlight follows Chiron, a young black man grappling with a difficult childhood and his sexuality, through three key stages of his life.

Articles + Essays

Taking Steps to Eliminate Racism in the Workplace

This article speaks to how racism in the workplace manifests, drawing a light on what microagressions look like. Looking at past trainings, HR departments can learn from the pitfalls and success from companies that have tried to address modern day racsism.

TV + Film

Queen Sugar

Queen Sugar tells the story of a rural Louisiana family dealing with the state of their patriarch's sugarcane farm after his passing, and how it impacts each of their individual lives.

Books

Americanah

Americanah tells the story of a young Nigerian woman, Ifemelu, who immigrates to the United States for university. Readers see the varied Black experience in America, Nigeria and the UK through the eyes of Ifemelu and her high school sweetheart Obinze.

Books

Kindred

Written by Octavia Butler in 1979, this science fiction novel incorporates time travel into a narrative about a woman who finds herself moving between 1976 LA and a pre-Civil War Maryland plantation. As an undergrad peer tutor in college, I worked with students writing an essay about this novel, and part of why it's so important to me is because this was a story that a lot of my students read for the first time that didn't feature a main character exactly like them. It really rocked their world.