Documentaries

13th

Ava DuVernay's powerful and informative documentary, 13th seeks to prove that though slavery was "abolished" in 1865 with the 13th amendment, it lives on as a booming industry in America. All thanks to a small loophole in the amendment along with unjust practices such as Jim Crow laws, the war on drugs, and the school to prison pipeline. She exposes the ways in which the American judicial system exploits African American's, allowing for modern day slavery.

Articles + Essays

Justice in the Age of Big Data

Cathy O'Neil explains the detrimental feedback loop that is created by crime prediction software. While on paper there can be benefits to predicting where crimes will take place, if the data set includes "nuisance crimes" like vagrancy, aggressive panhandling and selling and consuming small quantities of drugs, more police are drawn into those neighborhoods and thus, more people are arrested for low level crimes.

Articles + Essays

Say Their Names; Know Their Names

We say their names. We learn their stories. But how do we continue supporting the families of those lost to police brutality? How do we continue to remember them? This site searches for answers.

Articles + Essays

Communications Toolkit for Social Justice

This beautfully designed toolkit takes readers through a step by step process on how to strategically approach speaking to social justice. The focus of this toolkit is to outline framing principles and strategies that support the long-term movement and then apply them toward shorter-term victories.

Documentaries

I Am Not Your Negro

I Am Not Your Negro brings James Baldwin's unfinished manuscript, Remember This House, to life. The documentary is chock-full of archival material and recounts Baldwin's notes on the lives and assassinations of civil rights leaders, Medgar Evers, Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcom X.

Podcasts

Pod Save the People

On Pod Save the People, DeRay Mckesson explores news, culture, social justice, and politics with Sam Sinyangwe, Kaya Henderson and De’Ara Balenger. They offer a unique take on the news, with a special focus on overlooked stories and topics that often impact people of color.

Podcasts

Intersectionality Matters!

Intersectionality Matters! is hosted by American civil rights advocate and leading critical race theory scholar, Professor Kimberlé Crenshaw. It features interview with some of the worlds most interesting and innovative activists, artists, and scholars approaching current events through an intersectional lens. They cover various topics from voter suppression in the upcoming election, to the effects of COVID on prisoners and immigrants in detention centers.

TV + Film

When They See Us

Based on the true story of the Central Park Five, Ava DuVernay's powerful four episode Netflix show depicts the story of the wrongful 1990 conviction of five black boys from Harlem in the violent rape and assault of a 28 year old white woman in Central Park. The show explores America's unjust judicial system and the difficulties ex-convicts face when adjusting to a new world.

Articles + Essays

Malcolm and Martin

Written by James Baldwin in 1972, this Esquire article recounts Baldwin's interactions with Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X. Through personal narratives, Baldwin speaks to the intricacies of how MLK, Malcolm X and his own forms of actvism interacted and intersected with one another.

TV + Film

Precious

Based on the novel Push by Sapphire, Precious tells the story of a young black teenager fighting to overcome sexual and physical abuse, poverty, and neglect to survive and achieve a better future for herself.

TV + Film

Fruitvale Station

Based on the true tragedy of Oscar Grant, this film follows his life in the Bay Area, trying to legally make ends meet for his girlfriend and young daughter. The film focuses mainly on Oscar's final day on Earth. What was supposed to be a harmless New Year's Eve celebration with friends, ended as a cautionary tale for black men and their dealings with police.

Documentaries

LA 92

National Geographic documentary showcasing the tumultuous LA riots following the Rodney King trial verdit of 1992. The documentary does an incredible job of providing cultural context around the racial tensions of that time and highlights the eerie parallels between the '92 LA riots and '56 Watts riots - questioning how much progress America has truly made with police brutality.

Books

Beloved

Toni Morrison's Beloved is a fictional piece that follows the lives of escaped slave Sethe and her daughter Denver who live in a haunted house in the late 1870s. Spiritual, heartrending, and written at times in gruesomely realistic ways, Beloved is one of those books that makes your soul ache. It takes a piece of you after you put it down, but gives you something just as valuable, if not more, in return.

TV + Film

Get Out

Get Out explores the complicated racial dynamics at play in interracial relationships during a meet-the-parents weekend with a darker purpose than initially meets the eye.

Documentaries

Disclosure

Depictions in the media shape how we see the world around us and how we see ourselves. Through heartfelt interviews with leading trans creatives and thinkers, Disclosure gives an in-depth look at tv and film depictions of transgender people and the impact of those stories not just on transgender lives but American culture.

Podcasts

1619

This six-part podcast is a strong entry point into the New York Times’ ongoing interactive project examining the centuries-long shadow of slavery and its presence in modern-day America. Each episode traces issues like the fight for access to healthcare or the ‘sound’ of American music back to the institution of slavery and the role enslaved people played in shaping our country.

Books

The Bluest Eye

Toni Morrison is arguably one of the most profound writers in history, and her debut novel is no exception. The Bluest Eye looks at themes of beauty, conformity and Black womanhood, and is one of the most poetic investigations of intersectional identities I've ever read.

Podcasts

Rough Translation | The Global Legacy of George Floyd

In this episode, NPR’s Rough Translation explores the impact of George Floyd’s death. A Dutch lawyer, Indigenous activist in New Zealand, Syrian artist, social media consultant in Brazil, and a senior lecturer in Kenya discuss the ways in which it has reflected injustice and systems of oppressions in their own countries.

Articles + Essays

White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack

This brief but impactful article written by Peggy McIntosh in 1989 reconciles her own grapplings with white privilege. This is an incredibly important piece to read for white people seeking to be better allies to Black Americans and people of color -- it's difficult to ignore the truth when it's bulleted in a list.

TV + Film

POSE

Set in the late 80's and early 90's, Pose is a celebration of the New York City ballroom scene and the LGBTQ community who thrived within it. The series is the first with a predominately trans cast and crew.

TV + Film

Moonlight

The Oscar-winning Moonlight follows Chiron, a young black man grappling with a difficult childhood and his sexuality, through three key stages of his life.

Articles + Essays

Taking Steps to Eliminate Racism in the Workplace

This article speaks to how racism in the workplace manifests, drawing a light on what microagressions look like. Looking at past trainings, HR departments can learn from the pitfalls and success from companies that have tried to address modern day racsism.

TV + Film

Queen Sugar

Queen Sugar tells the story of a rural Louisiana family dealing with the state of their patriarch's sugarcane farm after his passing, and how it impacts each of their individual lives.

Books

Americanah

Americanah tells the story of a young Nigerian woman, Ifemelu, who immigrates to the United States for university. Readers see the varied Black experience in America, Nigeria and the UK through the eyes of Ifemelu and her high school sweetheart Obinze.

Books

Kindred

Written by Octavia Butler in 1979, this science fiction novel incorporates time travel into a narrative about a woman who finds herself moving between 1976 LA and a pre-Civil War Maryland plantation. As an undergrad peer tutor in college, I worked with students writing an essay about this novel, and part of why it's so important to me is because this was a story that a lot of my students read for the first time that didn't feature a main character exactly like them. It really rocked their world.